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KELELA: An EXCLUSIVE Q&A

TRUTH OR DARE:
STEPHEN SPAZ SCHNEE: TAKE ME APART is just about to be released.  How are you feeling about the way the album turned out and the reaction to it so far?
KELELA: I feel great about the way the album turned out.  I spent so much time on the album to make it be exactly what I wanted to hear so that’s been very gratifying.  The reaction to the album has also been really positive but I definitely think of it as supplementary.  I try to make things I like to hear myself and then hope somebody digs it.  I’m trying to make something that is sincere and so it’s just an extra plus that anybody else is vibing with it.

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YEP ROC TURNS 20: An EXCLUSIVE Q&A with Yep Roc co-founder Glenn Dicker

STEPHEN SPAZ SCHNEE: Before starting Yep Roc, were you an avid music collector? Were there any particular genres that you focused on personally?
GLENN DICKER: I would say that I was very much a music collector since I was a little kid. I got very interested in collecting 45’s when I went around to garage sales with my parents and as I got older that spread to full albums when I could afford it. Early on I was into ‘60s music, mostly what would be considered classic rock these days like The Beatles, Stones, Who, Kinks, etc. But as I got a bit older I got caught up in the punk rock thing, mostly the English bands. My favorite was The Jam. When I got out of school and went to work for Rounder Distribution, I got turned onto so much more that really opened my mind to all kinds of great stuff that I had previously only dabbled in like World Music, Blues, Jazz, Folk, Bluegrass, etc. Once I get into an artist, I usually want everything.

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ODESZA: An EXCLUSIVE Q&A!

 
 
A MOMENT APART:
 
An EXCLUSIVE
Q&A with 
Harrison Mills
STEPHEN SPAZ SCHNEE: A MOMENT APART has just been released.  How are you feeling about the album and the reaction you’ve had so far?
HARRISON MILLS: This album represents the next chapter of our project.  We’ve wanted for so long to push our sound and mature as musicians. With A MOMENT APART we’ve accomplished a denser, more cinematic sound that incorporates a lot of organic, symphonic instruments. We’ve always considered ourselves an album band, so it’s hard to give people a song out of context, and even harder to choose those singles.  The advance releases cover a lot of styles and genres, so it’s been interesting to see listeners kind of pick and choose their favorites.  We’re excited for people to be able to listen to the album in full – the narrative of the album gives a lot of context to those songs.

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An EXCLUSIVE Q&A with ANTIBALAS’ Martin Perna

WHERE THE GODS ARE IN PEACE:

STEPHEN SPAZ SCHNEE: WHERE THE GODS ARE IN PEACE is just about to be released. How are you feeling about the way the album turned out and the reaction to it so far?
MARTIN PERNA: We are happy with the way the album turned out, or else we wouldn’t have put it out. It was a lot of work and represents several years of effort working through some problems that would have sunk most other bands. We had some members graduate to other projects not long after our last record in 2012, and this album proves both to ourselves and people who listen to us that we have more juice than ever.

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BRONSKI BEAT: An EXCLUSIVE Q&A with Steve Bronski!

     It has been 33 years since Bronski Beat arrived on the music scene with their remarkably emotional debut single “Smalltown Boy.” Jimmy Somerville’s soaring falsetto was quite a wonder to behold but the music performed by Steve Bronski and Larry Steinbachek was equally enthralling. Equally enchanting, the band’s debut album THE AGE OF CONSENT was Synthpop at it’s finest. Inspired by classic Disco and the Electronic Music scene that was sweeping the UK, the trio blended their influences into a wondrous brew. Add in their thought-provoking lyrics that focused on gay-related issues and you had a band that not only made you dance but also made you think. Surprisingly, in 1985, at the height of the band’s popularity, Somerville abruptly quit, leaving Bronski and Steinbachek to carry on without him. The following year, the band returned with new vocalist John Foster and released the Pop-errific sophomore album TRUTHDARE DOUBLEDARE. Although “Hit That Perfect Beat” and “C’mon! C’mon!” were hits, the album didn’t fare as well as their debut and the band left their label (London Records). Foster left the fold and Bronski and Steinbachek’s continued to work together throughout the rest of the ‘80s and into the ‘90s. They released their third album, RAINBOW NATION, with new vocalist Jonathan Hellyer and additional musical assistance from Ian Donaldson. However, the band quietly split in 1995 shortly after that album’s release.

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FASTBALL: An EXCLUSIVE Q&A with Miles Zuniga

Maximum Velocity:
The Return of FASTBALL
    Over two decades after the release of their  debut album, Austin-based trio Fastball is just getting started. Still
comprised of Miles Zuniga  (vocals/guitar), Tony Scalzo (vocals/bass) and Joey Shuffeld (drums), Fastball has nothing left to prove. They’ve achieved everything that  all bands strive for when they first get together – a record deal, tours, hits  (1998’s “The Way” is their biggest so far) and respect. Now that they’ve been  able to step away from the spotlight for eight years, they sound refreshed,  focused and re-energized. But please don’t call STEP INTO LIGHT a  comeback album. Comebacks are often desperate attempts at replenishing the bank
accounts by taking advantage of fans’ fond memories. Fastball is merely picking up the bat, taking a swing and knocking another one out of the park. STEP  INTO LIGHT is a fantastic album that reminds people just how good this band has always been. In fact, it may be their most consistent full-length  platter to date. The boys have a home run on their hands and they’ve left their  contemporaries – new and old – in the dust. Again.
    Stephen  SPAZ Schnee was able to pitch some questions to Fastball member Miles  Zuniga, who graciously took the time to throw back some answers…

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ROBYN HITCHCOCK: An EXCLUSIVE interview!

Always Pistachio:

STEPHEN SPAZ SCHNEE: Your self-titled album is about to be released. How are you feeling about the journey to make this album and the reaction to it so far?
ROBYN HITCHCOCK: Well, the people that normally like my records like this one, so far. And that’s it really – if you like this one, you’ll probably like the others. If not, I’m not your flavor. That’s why the record is simply my name. The journey? Well it was the lucky coincidence of my moving to Nashville at the same point that Brendan Benson was getting in touch, asking if I’d like to come and record with him there.

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TIMBER TIMBRE: An EXCLUSIVE Q&A with Taylor Kirk!

SINCERELY, FUTURE POLLUTION

STEPHEN SPAZ SCHNEE: SINCERELY, FUTURE POLLUTION is about to be released. How are you feeling about the album and the reaction you’ve had to it so far?
TAYLOR KIRK: I’m extremely proud of the recording. I feel it’s without a doubt the best effort yet. Reactions are encouraging.

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THE VIBRATORS: An EXCLUSIVE interview with John EDDIE Edwards!

GOOD VIBRATIONS:

 

     Like any genre, Punk was never about just one ‘thing’ – it was a movement made up of many moving parts. Behind the torn jeans, mohawks, leather jackets and missing teeth (thanks, mosh pits), Punk was first and foremost about the music. Initially, a reaction against the overblown pomp of Progressive Rock and Disco (and any other musical movement that the Punk kids deemed pretentious and worthy of a kick in the gonads), Punk became the most influential movement in Rock history since Elvis had his crown stolen by The Beatles in 1964. In 1976, Punk Rock scared people. However, it wasn’t meant to destroy and move on – Punk was about taking Rock back to ground zero and rebuilding it from the ground up. Punk stole the blueprint from Chuck Berry’s safe and brought Rock ‘n’ Roll back to its basic foundation. Sex Pistols was the first band to gain international notoriety, but the whole of England was soon swarming with equally important bands like The Clash, Buzzcocks, The Jam, The Damned, et al. It was a beautiful thing. These bands knew how to write a cracking tune and that is why they are still remembered 40 years after Punk broke wide open.

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